Promising breakthrough treatments for cardiovascular disease are on the horizon. Create access to leading-edge clinical trials and health screening opportunities for your patients by partnering wit​h Care Access.

Importance of  Lp(a) Screening for Your Patients

Lipoprotein(a), or Lp(a), has shown to silently block arteries and induce inflammation. Elevated Lp(a) significantly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, including having a 50% increased risk for a heart attack compared to people with lower Lp(a). 1 

Elevations in Lp(a) At-a-Glance

Prevalence Most common genetic dyslipidemia globally, impacting at least
1 in 5 individuals. 
Causes Genetically determined and stable by age 5; not significantly impacted by lifestyle or medications.2 
Risks Lp(a) is associated with a higher risk of heart attack and aortic stenosis. Individuals with Lp(a) levels >30 mg/dL face a high cardiovascular risk, with 1 in 3 individuals falling into this category.3 
Clinical Limitations Lack of targeted therapies has led to limited insurance coverage
for testing, which in turn led to a lack of awareness for patients
and physicians. 
Practice-Changing
Breakthroughs on the Horizon 
Next generation therapies that use RNA silencing technology to significantly reduce Lp(a) are currently being evaluated in clinical trials.4 These therapies are injections every 1–2 months and can reduce Lp(a) levels by >90%. 

1 in 14

heart attacks and

1 in 7

cases of aortic valve disease 

are due to Lipoprotein(a) cholesterol 5

Screening and Clinical Trials—Offered by You 

Community physicians are key to making clinical trials accessible to all patients. By partnering with Care Access as a Trial Access Partner on the Future of Medicine program, you can help your patients get screened for cardiometabolic health risks and access new investigational treatments through your practice. 

Here’s how we work with our Trial Access Partners:

Trial Access Partner

Care Access

Learn

Schedule

Lab Test

Results

Educate

Match

You provide patients with information about screening (in-office, EMR messages, phone calls, etc.)

You provide patients with a practice-specific online scheduling link

You receive patients' test results (if they consent) and continue to guide their regular care

You help educate your patients on new trial opportunities 

We provide your practice with educational materials and staff support to help spread the word 

We handle online scheduling and screening communications

We manage patient screening blood draws at, or near, your office

We communicate results directly back to patients 

We engage participants with health and clinical research information

We let participants know ​if they potentially qualify for a clinical trial. We keep you informed about patients enrolled in trials

Cardiovascular Advisory Board

The Care Access Cardiovascular Advisory Board provides expert opinion on important issues impacting clinical trials, including patient safety, quality, and creating access for communities that are underrepresented in clinical research. They also provide oversight and guidance for the cardiometabolic health screenings and educational resources provided to those participating in the Future of Medicine program by Care Access.

References

  1. Patel AP, Wang M, Pirruccello JP, Ellinor PT, Ng K, Kathiresan S, Khera AV., Lp(a) (Lipoprotein[a]) Concentrations and Incident Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: New Insights From a Large National Biobank. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2021 Jan;41(1):465-474. doi: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.120.315291. Epub 2020 Oct 29. PMID: 33115266; PMCID: PMC7769893.
  2. Reyes-Soffer G., Ginsberg H.N., Berglund L., Duell P.B., Heffron S.P., Kamstrup P.R., Lloyd-Jones D.M., Marcovina S.M., Yeang C., Koschinsky M.L., Lipoprotein(a): A genetically determined, causal, and prevalent risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 2022;42:48–60. doi: 10.1161/ATV.0000000000000147
  3. Rikhi R., Hammoud A., Ashburn N., Snavely A.C., Michos E.D., Chevli P., Tsai M.Y., Herrington D., Shapiro M.D., Relationship of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and lipoprotein(a) to cardiovascular risk: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Atherosclerosis. 2022;363:102–108. doi: 10.1016 jatherosclerosis.2022.10.004.
  4. Sosnowska B, Surma S, Banach M., Targeted Treatment against Lipoprotein (a): The Coming Breakthrough in Lipid Lowering Therapy. Pharmaceuticals (Basel). 2022 Dec 16;15(12):1573. doi: 10.3390/ph15121573. PMID: 36559024; PMCID: PMC9781646.
  5. Afshar M, Kamstrup PR, Williams K, Sniderman AD, Nordestgaard BG, Thanassoulis G., Estimating the population impact of Lp(a) lowering on the incidence of myocardial infarction and aortic stenosis-brief report. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2016; 36: 2421–2423.

Erin Michos, MD, MHS, FACC, FAHA, FASE, FASPC

JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE

Dr. Michos is an internationally-recognized expert on women’s cardiovascular health, lipids, and cardiometabolic diseases. She is a co-investigator in the NIH-funded Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) studies, and Training Director for three American Heart Association Strategic Focused Research Networks (SFRN) in Women’s Cardiovascular Health, Cardiometabolic Disease, and Health Technology. Additionally, Dr. Michos holds the position of Co-Editor in Chief for the American Journal of Preventive Cardiology.  As the Director of Women’s Cardiovascular Health Research at Johns Hopkins, she educates women around the world about cardiometabolic disease risk factors. Her work also focuses on building strong relationships in communities to increase diversity and representation in clinical research through the IMPACT Center at Johns Hopkins, which she co-directs. 

Dr. Michos is an internationally-recognized expert on women’s cardiovascular health, lipids, and cardiometabolic diseases. She is a co-investigator in the NIH-funded Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) studies, and Training Director for three American Heart Association Strategic Focused Research Networks (SFRN) in Women’s Cardiovascular Health, Cardiometabolic Disease, and Health Technology. Additionally, Dr. Michos holds the position of Co-Editor in Chief for the American Journal of Preventive Cardiology.  As the Director of Women’s Cardiovascular Health Research at Johns Hopkins, she educates women around the world about cardiometabolic disease risk factors. Her work also focuses on building strong relationships in communities to increase diversity and representation in clinical research through the IMPACT Center at Johns Hopkins, which she co-directs. 

JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE

Erin Michos, MD, MHS, FACC, FAHA, FASE, FASPC

Seth Shay Martin, MD, MHS, FACC, FAHA, FASPC

JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE

Dr. Martin is a cardiologist and world-leading expert in the science of lipids. The Martin/Hopkins method, the most accurate way to calculate LDL cholesterol levels, was created by and named after him and his team at Johns Hopkins, and is now used around the world. As a committed advocate for equity in healthcare and as the Director of the Advanced Lipid Disorders Program and Director of the Center for Mobile Technologies to Achieve Equity in Cardiovascular Health (mTECH) at Johns Hopkins Medicine. He is deeply involved in research projects that shed light on ethnic differences in cardiovascular health, inclusive health technology to bridge the digital divide, and addressing barriers to care in predominantly Black communities of Maryland. He also mentors early-stage investigators helping to build a diverse research workforce. 

Ankur Kalra, MD, FACP, FACC, FSCAI

Franciscan Health

Dr. Kalra is an interventional cardiologist with vast experience in clinical research, including through his previous role as Medical Director of Clinical Research for Cleveland Clinic’s regional community-based hospitals. He is widely known for applying his scientific expertise towards helping South Asian and rural communities that are disproportionately impacted by heart disease. His lifelong work to address heart health disparities among South Asians, who have 4x the risk of cardiovascular disease, has helped build international awareness and collaboration among healthcare professionals.